Single Wedding Ring Block Tote Bag

What’s better than a Single Wedding Ring Block?  A Single Wedding Ring Block tote bag with linen!

single wedding ring tote (11 of 1)

I had one unfinished Single Wedding Ring Block sitting on my sewing table and decided to keep this one for myself.  Since I didn’t have anymore frames, I turned this one into a tote bag.  Obviously, you can never have too many bags!

single wedding ring tote (4 of 1)

I added linen strips around the block and quilted the front with Sashiko stitches like I did the original quilt blocks.  I love how the stitches look as they continue off the block onto the linen.  Seriously.  I can’t get enough of these perfect little stitches!

single wedding ring tote (3 of 1)

On the back, I used a piece of linen and used the Babylock Sashiko to quilt diagonal rows in groups of three.  Doesn’t that stitch look fantastic on the linen fabric!

single wedding ring tote (22 of 1)

I added black and beige straps and sewed them into the seam at the top of the bag.

single wedding ring tote (14 of 1)single wedding ring tote (20 of 1)

Little Des had a really hard time staying away from the bag while I took pictures.  He couldn’t resist adding his toy cars to the bag…  So helpful!

single wedding ring tote (15 of 1) single wedding ring tote (17 of 1)

The details totally pull the bag together!

single wedding ring tote (9 of 1)single wedding ring tote (5 of 1)single wedding ring tote (23 of 1) single wedding ring tote (10 of 1)

Here’s a question for you: Would you like to see these in my etsy shop?  I would love to see other people enjoy one as much as I do!

single wedding ring tote (1 of 1)

Boxy cosmetic bag tutorial

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (4 of 1)

Remember this adorable boxy cosmetic bag?  It was such a fun project that has already made two great gifts!  My sister-in-law over at Wit and Spice had a birthday coming up, so I decided to make one for her.  And since I was making another, I thought I’d work on that boxy cosmetic bag tutorial I promised.  Hope you enjoy it!

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (3 of 1)

Step 1: Draw and cut out your pattern on freezer paper using the diagram below.  If you would like to print it out, you can click on the image below.  Note: When you click on the image, it will give you a to scale pattern.  You will need to actually measure and draw out the actual pattern.

boxy-cosmetic-bag-pattern

Step 2: Cut out your fabrics.  You need:

1 main fabric cut on the fold (yellow fabric)

2 contrasting pieces (chambray fabric)

2 lining pieces (blue fabric)

1 15 inch by  24 inch piece of batting (for a more flexible/foldable bag) or Annie’s Soft and Stable (for a sturdier bag)

additional supplies: 12 inch zipper and coordinating threads

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (5 of 1)

Step 3: Sew your main fabric to your contrasting fabrics with right sides together and a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Press seams flat.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (6 of 1)

Step 4: Place your pieced outside panel on top of your batting or Annie’s Soft and Stable.  Do not cut it to the shape of your fabric.  Leave it in its rectangular form.  Pin your fabric to the interfacing.  I used the Babylock Sashiko to quilt my fabric to the interfacing, but you can also use a long running stitch on your sewing machine.  Practice on a scrap piece of fabric first to get the stitch length you want before you sew on your final fabric.  I used the guide on my Sashiko to help keep my rows of stitches to 1/2 inch apart from each other, but you can make yours closer or farther apart if you like.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (9 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (10 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (11 of 1)

Step 5:  After you finish your detail stitches, cut your interfacing down to the shape of the fabric.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (13 of 1)

Step 6: To attach your zipper, place your zipper and one of your front panels right sides together.  Make sure to position your zipper so that the beginning and end silver stops of the zipper are centered on your fabric.  You will want to use the zipper foot that goes with your machine.  It will make the process a million times easier!

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (14 of 1)

Step 7: I usually center the zipper foot between the teeth of the zipper and the edge of my fabric.  Place your needle close to the teeth of your zipper, but it doesn’t have to be right up against the side of the teeth.  It’s okay for there to be a slight amount of space in between the foot and the teeth.  If you sew too close to the teeth, it will make it difficult to open and close your zipper.  As you sew, you will need to move the zipper out of the way of your machine zipper foot.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (15 of 1)

Step 8: Now it’s time to sew the lining fabric to the zipper that goes with the main panel you just attached.  Place your lining fabric on top of the zipper, so that the zipper is sandwiched in between the main panel and lining fabrics.  The two fabrics should positioned with right sides together.  You will not be able to see the zipper as you sew, so turn your project over so that you see the wrong side of your main panel.  You should be able to see your stitches from where you attached the zipper to your main panel.  Sew on top of those stitches through all 3 layers (main panel with interfacing, zipper and lining).  Make sure to hold the layers together as you sew to prevent any shifting.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (16 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (17 of 1)

Step 9: On the right side of your main panel, stitch just below the zipper teeth (about 1/8 inch away) through all three layers to keep your fabrics from catching in your zipper.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (18 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (19 of 1)

Step 10: Repeat steps 6-9 with the other side of your zipper, main panel and lining fabric.

Step 11: With right sides together, sew your 2 lining pieces to each other where they will meet in the bottom center of your bag.  Use a 1/4 inch seam allowance and leave a 5 inch opening in the center to turn your bag inside out when you finish.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (20 of 1)

Step 12: With right sides together, line up the sides of your main panel of your bag where the zipper begins and pin them together.  Sew the ends together with a 1/2 inches seam allowance.  You will not be able to sew all the way across because the lining will be in your way.  Sew as far as you can to the center. Then, rotate it around and sew the other side until you meet the end of the stitches you just finished sewing. Repeat with the other side of your main panel. Repeat with lining pieces right sides together.

with-text-boxy-cosmetic-bag-tutorial-(21-of-1)

Step 13:  The only openings not sewn together should be a “square” cut out in each corner of your main panel and lining pieces.  Make sure your zipper is mostly open, so you can turn your bag inside out.  Pinch one “square” together so that the two layers lay flat. Make sure the seams where your main fabric and contrasting fabrics line up on both sides.  Pin them together and sew with a 1/2 inch seam allowance.  Repeat with each opening in your main panel and lining.  You will probably have to rip out a few seams in this step and try it again, but don’t give up!  A wise seamstress once told me if I didn’t rip out a seam at least once, I wasn’t doing it correctly!

with-text-boxy-cosmetic-bag-tutorial-(23-of-1)with-text-boxy-cosmetic-bag-tutorial-(22-of-1)

Step 14: Turn bag right side out and sew the opening in your lining closed by hand or by machine.  If you want to sew it by machine, you will be able to see the stitches from the right side of your lining.  However, you can pin the opening shut (with seam allowance tucked inside) and use a 1/8 inch seam allowance, so it will not be that noticeable.

boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (1 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (2 of 1)boxy cosmetic bag tutorial (24 of 1)

Single Wedding Ring Quilt Block

 

teal with red stitching (1 of 1)

I am so excited to be a part of this Single Wedding Ring Quilt Block blog hop (say that 3 times fast) over at the Fat Quarter Shop!  It was such a great coincidence that the project for this month was a vintage quilt pattern!  I’ve been wanting to take modern fabrics and use them to make a quilt with a vintage feel, but other projects kept jumping in line.  This was the perfect project to make me go ahead and try one of these vintage style blocks!  I used the FREE Single Wedding Ring Quilt Block pattern from the Fat Quarter Shop.

close up (5 of 1)orange with green stitching (3 of 1)

This was the first time I’ve made a quilt with so many pieces in one block, and actually the first time I’ve ever used a quilt pattern.  I learned so many tricks from watching the videos that Kimberly has on the Fat Quarter Shop YouTube channel. I watched the Single Wedding Ring Quilt Block video as well as the Sister’s Choice Block video to see how to cut and sew my triangles and squares together.

process1process-4

The Single Wedding Ring video shows you how to use triangle paper to cut and sew your pieces together, but since I didn’t have any, I used the techniques in the Sister’s Choice video to sew and cut.  Let me tell you… This technique was super easy and made the whole process go a lot more smoothly than I expected!  Thanks for the awesome hints!  I can’t wait to try the triangle paper and see if I can speed up the process even more!

process-5

I used Carolyn Friedlander’s Doe fabrics to make these quilt blocks.  Seriously Carolyn, could your fabrics be any more amazing!  Those few months I had to wait for these fabrics to hit the stores felt like forever!  I not so secretly glared at instagram photos of people who got the fabrics in advance.  Don’t they look fantastic!

process-3

I cut my squares out to measure 4 inches because I wanted to give myself plenty of room for error, when I went to sew my squares together.  After sewing, I cut my new squares down to 3 inches like the pattern asked.

process-6

For a quilt pattern newbie like me, the block pattern was easy to follow.  It was helpful to see how the block was broken down into sections and then pieced together to form the Single Wedding Ring.  Had I been left to my own devices, I would have probably just sewn the triangles straight across row by row, making sure that none of my points matched and ended up frustrated with a lopsided quilt block and vowing (pun intended) to never try my hand at this pattern ever again.  Remember, the block pattern is FREE on their website, but if you would like the pattern in other settings, you can purchase the Single Wedding Ring Quilt pattern from their site.  They even have a Single Wedding Ring Quilt kit available so you can easily make your own!

process-7process-8close up (6 of 1)

Want to hear some really great news?  You can purchase these three finished blocks from my etsy shop!  I’ve turned these quilted blocks into artwork that you can buy and decorate with in your home!  I’m having a hard time deciding which one I want to make for myself: the teal or the navy?  My kitchen wall is screaming for one of these!  I quilted each block with the Babylock Sashiko (seriously, my favorite) and used coordinating thread colors.  I love this extra, special detail.  I love that it somehow adds both a vintage and modern feel to the block; it looks like the stitch that your great grandmother could so perfectly make, but stitched in bright colors on those beautiful modern fabrics.

close up (1 of 1)

Each quilted block is framed in a 12 inch by 12 inch white frame and ready to hang on any wall.  Here’s the catch: there’s only one available in each color right now!  Which means there’s only three available!   Eeek!  Don’t miss out!

navy-with-green-stitchingclose up (3 of 1)close up (4 of 1)



 

 

 

All in a row quilt

All in a row quilt-8

If you follow me on Instagram, this All in a row quilt should look familiar!  It’s officially finished and ready to ship out to its new owner!  This was a custom quilt order meant as a wedding gift.  We worked together to pick out a color scheme and a pattern that we thought went well with the chosen fabrics, and the outcome is super cute!  Blues and greens are always my go to colors, so I love the way this turned out!

All in a row quilt-13All in a row quilt-10

I’d pinned this quilt from s.o.t.a.k. handmade’s blog a while back and thought it would be a fun way to piece this quilt.  I started with 15 fat quarters from this custom bundle from the Fat Quarter Shop and cut them vertically in varying widths: 2.5 inches, 3 inches and 3.5 inches.  Then I pieced the strips together randomly.  Usually, I lay out all my quilt pieces before I start sewing them together, but this time I just picked up random strips and sewed them together (with a 1/4 inch seam allowance) as I picked them out.  I wanted the width of the quilt to be about 42 inches, so I sewed between 20-22 strips in each row.  You’ll notice that the rows are not 18 inches tall like a fat quarter.  After I pieced together my 20-22 strips, I cut each row in half, so that I now had 2 rows that were 9 inches tall.  After I finished piecing together the individual rows, I laid out my rows where I wanted them and sewed them together with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.

All in a row quilt-3

To quilt the front to the back, I stitched vertical lines that were 3 inches apart from each other much like Svetlana did with her quilt.  I like to quilt with big, open spaces, so when you wash the quilt it puffs out a little between the rows and feels all nice and cozy.

All in a row quilt-2

Like I mentioned earlier, the quilt is a wedding gift and the buyer requested I put the wedding date on it somewhere.  Luckily, I have a sweet little Babylock Ellageo that can embroider such things!  I stitched the date on a piece of linen and hand sewed it to the back with embroidery floss.  Love the personal touch it gives the quilt!  The finished size was about 42 inches by 58 inches.

All in a row quilt-12

Such a fun quilt to make!

All in a row quilt-1 All in a row quilt-7 All in a row quilt-14

Baby boy zipper pouch

Need a place to keep all your tiny essentials on the go?  These little baby boy zipper pouches are the perfect size to keep in your purse or help organize your diaper bag.  There’s no such thing as having too many zipper pouches!  Use fun fabrics your little one will love to look at (and probably want to open)!  I have one that I keep little toys, a brush and other random kid friendly stuff in, and Des has more fun trying to open and close the zipper than pay attention to what’s inside!

baby boy zippy pouch (18 of 1)

The main fabric on the outside of the bag is Dwell Studio and the lining is from Heather Bailey’s Lottie Da collection.  The contrasting fabric on the outside is waxed canvas.  I love waxed canvas fabrics.  The textured imperfections are just beautiful.  I’ve been dying to make something out of waxed canvas for a while and wanted to start with something small.  This little project was perfect.  You have to be careful when sewing with this kind of canvas because it doesn’t feed as easily through a machine as regular canvas.  If you choose to add waxed canvas to your project, make sure you use at least a size 16 needle and feed it carefully through your machine.

baby boy zippy pouch (19 of 1)

These instructions are for a 7 inch by almost 4 inch finished pouch, but you can make it bigger if you like.

To make a pouch like this one, you will need the following pieces of fabric:

2 – 8 inch by 4 inch pieces of main fabric

2 – 8 inch by 3 inch pieces of contrasting fabric

2 – 8 inch by 6 inch pieces of lining fabric

You also need a 7 inch zipper and coordinating thread.

baby boy zippy pouch (1 of 1)Step 1: With right sides together, sew your main fabric to your contrasting fabric to make the outside panels of your pouch.

baby boy zippy pouch (2 of 1)baby boy zippy pouch (3 of 1)Step 2: Press your seams open.  Note: Do not iron directly on waxed canvas!  It will destroy your beautiful fabric! It’s best to not iron it all, but if you do, use a press cloth over your canvas.  

baby boy zippy pouch (4 of 1)Step 3: To attach your zipper, place your zipper and one of your front panels right sides together.  Make sure to position your zipper so that the beginning and end silver stops of the zipper are centered on your fabric.  You will want to use the zipper foot that goes with your machine.  It will make the process a million times easier!

baby boy zippy pouch (5 of 1)baby boy zippy pouch (6 of 1)Step 4: I usually center the zipper foot between the teeth of the zipper and the edge of my fabric.  Place your needle close to the teeth of your zipper, but it doesn’t have to be right up against the side of the teeth.  It’s okay for there to be a slight amount of space in between the foot and the teeth.  If you sew too close to the teeth, it will make it difficult to open and close your zipper.  As you sew, you will need to move the zipper out of the way of your machine zipper foot.

baby boy zippy pouch (7 of 1)Step 5: Now it’s time to sew the lining fabric to the zipper that goes with the main panel you just attached.  Place your lining fabric on top of the zipper, so that the zipper is sandwiched in between the main panel and lining fabrics.  The two fabrics should positioned with right sides together.  You will not be able to see the zipper as you sew, so turn your project over so that you see the wrong side of your main panel.  You should be able to see your stitches from where you attached the zipper to your main panel.  Sew on top of those stitches through all 3 layers (main panel, zipper and lining).  Make sure to hold the layers together as you sew to prevent any shifting.

baby boy zippy pouch (8 of 1)Step 6: On the right side of your main panel, topstitch just below the zipper teeth through all three layers to keep your fabrics from catching in your zipper.

baby boy zippy pouch (9 of 1)baby boy zippy pouch (10 of 1)Step 7: Repeat steps 3-6 with the other side of your zipper and 2 pieces of fabric.

baby boy zippy pouch (11 of 1)Step 8: On the bottom edge of to main panels, cut out a square that measures 1.5 inches by 1.5 inches.  Repeat with the bottom edge of your lining pieces.

baby boy zippy pouch (12 of 1)Step 9: With right sides together match the seams on the front and back main panels together and pin them.

baby boy zippy pouch (13 of 1)Step 10: Open your zipper halfway.  Lay your project out with the two main panels facing right sides together and your two lining pieces right sides together.  Pin around all the outside edges except where you cut out the squares in each bottom corner.  Sew with a 5/8 inch seam allowance down the two sides of your project.  Be careful when you get to your zipper teeth.  You will probably need to get as close to the teeth as you can and then lift your needle and pressure foot to move your zipper past the needle.

Step 11:  Sew with a 5/8 inch seam allowance along the bottom edges to attach your main panels together.  Repeat with the two lining pieces, but leave a 4 inch opening to turn the pouch inside out when you finish.  Remember: Do not sew the edges of your “square.”

Step 12: Take one corner “square” and pinch it together so that the seam from one side and the seam from the bottom are lined up.  Pin it and sew along the raw edge with a 1/2 inch seam allowance.  Repeat with the other 3 “squares.”baby boy zippy pouch (14 of 1) baby boy zippy pouch (15 of 1)Step 13: Turn your pouch inside out and sew the opening in your lining closed by hand.

baby boy zippy pouch (17 of 1)baby boy zippy pouch (20 of 1)

Boxy Cosmetic Bag with Sashiko stitching

boxy cosmetic bag (2 of 1)

One of my sewing goals for this year is to make at least 10 new projects that I’ve never attempted before.  I’m hoping that I can learn some new sewing skills and master some old ones!  It’s only the middle of January, and I’ve already got one project down: A boxy cosmetic bag!

boxy cosmetic bag (1 of 1)

To tell you the truth, I was always kind of hesitant about making one of these, because who wouldn’t be intimidated by a zipper with a lining and boxy edges?  First go round… Yeah, I wanted to chuck it and find a new project, but I loved the way the chambray fabric and Elizabeth Olwen print made it look.  So, I tried again.

boxy cosmetic bag (3 of 1)

And I can barely stand how adorable it is!  I’m going to have a really hard time giving this one away!  I added some Sashiko stitching on the chambray fabric and sealed its fate as the cutest cosmetic bag!  Don’t you just love those sweet stitches!

boxy cosmetic bag (6 of 1)

Oh, and did you notice the zipper?  The chunky, metal teeth add a little more charm to this boxy cosmetic case.  For some reason, the metal zippers add a little more appeal than the plastic ones.  Is that just me?

boxy cosmetic bag (5 of 1)

The bag measures 4.5 inches by 7.5 inches, and it is 5.5 inches tall.  It has plenty of room to store all your cosmetics when you travel.  When you’re home, it’s pretty enough to sit on your bathroom counter and hide away the clutter that tends to gather around the sink.

boxy cosmetic bag (7 of 1)

If I’m feeling adventurous, I plan to make a tutorial for this project.  You know you really want to make these for all your friends!  Or maybe just make a few for yourself!

boxy cosmetic bag (4 of 1)